George W Wells

ID# 14581, b. about 1912
Birth:
George W Wells was born about 1912.


Marriage:
George W Wells married Lilian Dearnley, daughter of John Thomas Dearnley and Margaret Lilly Smith, about November 1939 at Sheffield, Yorkshire.

Nina Bluett Page

ID# 14582, b. 7 March 1905, d. October 1989
From about November 1931, her married name was Dearnley.
Birth:
Nina Bluett Page was born on 7 March 1905.


Marriage:
Nina Bluett Page married Walter Harold Gillman Dearnley, son of Walter Nathan Dearnley and Hilda Maria Gillman, about November 1931 at Edmonton, London.


Death:
Nina Bluett Page died in October 1989 at Surrey N.W. R.D., Surrey, at age 84 years and 6 months
Indexed as Nina Bluett Dearnley, born 7 March 1905.

Nina Bluett Page appeared in the 1939 register at
16 Manor Way, Egham U.D., Surrey.
In September 1939:-

Walter N Dearnley 05 Dec 1874 Male Retired Army Captain Married
Hilda M Dearnley 24 Feb 1884 Female Unpaid Domestic Duties Married
Walter H G Dearnley 14 Jan 1905 Male Company Senior Clerk And Supervising Accountant Married
Nina B Dearnley 07 Mar 1905 Female Unpaid Domestic Duties Married
1 more person record which is officially closed.


Henry Dernelegh

ID# 14585, b. about 1345
Henry Dernelegh was also recorded as Henry de Dernelegh.
He was also recorded as Henry de Dernelee.
He was also recorded as Henry Dearnley.
He was also recorded as Dearnaley - (spelling not found but added for search.)

Note:

'... one Robert de Buckley, son of John de Buckley, was seised in a fee of a messuage and lands in Honnersfield 1, and having married Alice , daughter of Roger de Wyandene, had issue a son John, and after the death of Robert the son of John and John the son of Robert the estate descended to James2 the son of the last named John ; but Alice, the widow married for her second husband Henry de Dernleigh, and Robert del Holt had "intruded" on the estate and given it to her as dower, whereupon James del Holt, escheator of Henry IV. [1399-1413] seised the estate for the King.The result of this enquiry was that it was declared that Henry Dernelegh being an outlaw3 the said James was entitled to the lands, &c.'
History of the Parish of Rochdale p. 391

1 Hundersfield (also more anciently known as Honersfield and Honnersfield) was a manor, parish and, from 1746, township, within the parish of Rochdale, in the hundred of Salford, England. It straddled the historic county boundary between Lancashire and the West Riding of Yorkshire. There are written references to the parish dating back to 1202.
Hundersfield lay on high moorland around Blackstone Edge, containing the settlements of Todmorden, Walsden, Littleborough, Wardle, Smallbridge and parts of Rochdale.
The name Hundersfield is a corruption of Honorsfield; and that was derived from the word "Honore", signifying a Saxon lord.[1] Hundersfield was originally one of four townships within Rochdale, but was itself split into four. Hundersfield was divided into four townships or civil parishes which were all originally within the ancient ecclesiastical parish of Rochdale.

2 According to Dugdale this James should be Ralph

3 In 1400 it was stated that Henry de Dearnley had been outlawed in 1372 at the suit of Henry de Haworth for trespass, and that his land in Hundersfield had passed into the hands of the Ashton family; Pal. of Lanc. Misc. 1/9, m. 87–8; Dep. Keeper's Rep. xl, App. 536.


Birth:
Henry Dernelegh was born about 1345.


Marriage:
Henry Dernelegh married Cecily Monk, daughter of Thomas Monk and Denise (?), about 1367.



Note:
on 17 August 1367
Grant MD335/3/1/5/141 17 Aug 1367
Contents:
1. Thomas del Stokke, rector of the church of Derton and Sir Nicholas de Rylay, chaplain
2. Henry de Dernilegh and Cecily his wife, daughter of Thomas Monk of Chyffte Thomas and Sir Nicholas grant to Henry and Cecily, and the heirs of their bodies, of all the lands and tenements and reversions with appurtenances, which they had of the grant of the said Cecily within the bounds of the vills of Chyffte and Crigelston; with remainder in default of issue to Cecily, her heirs or assigns, after Henry's death, or to Henry, his heirs or assigns, after Cecily's death. Witnesses: John de Dronsfeld, John Tours, John de Staynton, Thomas de Doddeworth, Thomas Stevenson of Cheyfft. At Cheyffte and Crygelston. Two seals; red wax (details given). Former ref: MD 335 Box 69 Clay vol VIII No 76: Series B No. 30: Dorse 435]

see The National Archives.



Note:
in 1372 at Hundersfield
In 1400 it was stated that Henry de Dearnley had been outlawed in 1372 at the suit of Henry de Haworth for trespass, and that his land in Hundersfield had passed into the hands of the Ashton family;
Pal. of Lanc. Misc. 1/9, m. 87-8; Dep. Keeper's Rep. xl, App. 536.

After the death of Robert de Buckley his widow Alice married Henry de Dearnley, an outlaw, whereupon the escheator took the estate into the king's hands, or, at least, the widow's third part. Alice died in Sept. 1423, and John de Buckley, son of Robert, in Oct. 1429, leaving a son and heir James;
ibid. no. 496; Towneley MS. DD, no. 1483; Dep. Keeper's Rep. xl, App. 536. The lands were held of Sir Thomas Savile in socage.



'
escheator':
In feudal England, escheat referred to the situation where the tenant of a fief died without an heir or committed a felony. The fief reverted to the King's ownership for one year and one day, by right of primer seisin, after which it reverted to the original lord who had granted it. From the time of Henry III, the monarchy took particular interest in escheat as a source of revenue.

From the 12th century onward, the Crown appointed escheators to manage escheats and report to the Exchequer, with one escheator per county established by the middle of the 14th century. Upon learning the death of a tenant, the escheator would hold an "inquisition post mortem" to learn if the king had any rights to the land. These were often preceded by a "writ of diem clausit extremum" issued by the king to seize the lands and hold the I.P.M. If there was any doubt, the escheator would seize the land and refer the case to Westminster where it would be settled, ensuring that not one day's revenue would be lost. This would be a source of concern with land owners when there were delays from Westminster.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Escheat.



Note:
in 1382
Grant *MD335/3/1/5/147* 25 Apr 1382
*Contents*:
1. John Pelle of Crykelston
2. Sir Richard de Dronsfeld, chaplain, and Henry de Dernylegh
John grants to Sir Richard and Henry of all the messuages, with buildings, lands and tenements, rents and services, with appurtenances which he had in the vills of Cheyfft, Crykelston, Walton and Sandall by curtesy after the death of Alice daughter of Thomas Monck his wife; to hold for the grantor's life. Witnesses: John de Staynton, Thomas de Whetelay, Thomas de Cheyfft, William de Doddeworth, Thomas de Staynton. At Crykelston. Seal; red wax, round.
[Former ref: MD 335 Box 69 Clay vol VIII No 81: Series B No. 36: Dorse 71]


Quitclaim *MD335/3/1/5/148* 1 May 1382
*Contents*:
1. Henry de Dernelee
2. Sir Richard Dronsfeld, chaplain
Henry quitclaims to Sir Richard all right in the premises detailed in md335/3/1/5/147 :- [all the messuages, with buildings, lands and tenements, rents and services, with appurtenances which he had in the vills of Cheyfft, Crykelston, Walton and Sandall by curtesy after the death of Alice daughter of Thomas Monck his wife.] At Berneslay. Seal; red wax, round with a flower.
[Former ref: MD 335 Box 69 Clay vol VIII No 81n: Series B No. 37: Dorse 69]
from the H. L. Bradfer-Lawrence Collection


Grant MD335/3/1/5/151 4 May 1382
These documents are held at Bradfer-Lawrence, Harry, 1887-1965, land agent and antiquary
Contents:
1. Henry de Dernele and Cecily his wife, daughter of Thomas Monk of Chyft
2. Sirs John Howell, perpetual vicar of Sandale, William de Walton, chaplain, and John de Wodroff Henry and Cecily grant to Sir John, William and John of all the lands and tenements and reversions, with appurtenances, which they had of the grant of Sir Thomas del Stokke, rector of the church of Darton, and Sir Nicholas de Rylay, chaplain, within the bounds of the vills of Chiefet and Crykelston; also all the lands and tenements and reversions, rents and services, with appurtenances, which they had within the bounds of the vills of Sandale and Walton by hereditary right after the death of Thomas Monk son of Thomas Monk the elder. Witnesses: Thomas Bosuyll of Ardeslay, John de Dronsfeld, John de S[t]aynton, Thomas de Staynton of Wlfelay, William de Dodwrht. At Chyeft. Two seals; red wax, one broken.
(see also md335/3/1/5/140, 141 and 142.) [Former ref: MD 335 Box 69 Clay vol VIII No 84: Series B No. 40: Dorse 70]
see The National Archives


Fine MD335/3/1/5/152 1382
These documents are held at Bradfer-Lawrence, Harry, 1887-1965, land agent and antiquary
Contents:
1. John Hewell, vicar of the church of Sandale, William Walton, chaplain, and John Woderoue, querents
2. Henry Dernele and Cecily his wife and Thomas Berneslay and Alice his wife, deforciants
Fine at Westminster before Robert Bealknapp, William de Skipwyth, Roger de Fulthorp and Henry Asty, justices. Concerning two messuages, eighty acres of land, twelve acres of meadow, 3 s. 2 d. rent, and a third part of a messuage, forty six acres of land, and six acres of meadow, with appurtenances in Cheuet, Cregilston, Sandale and Walton; the deforciants recognized the tenements as the right of John Woderoue as those which the querents had of the grant of the deforciants, and quitclaimed them to him and his heirs from them and the heirs of Cecily and Alice. The querents gave 100 marks of silver. Two parts, joined by a tag with a seal of red wax, letter B.
[Former ref: MD 335 Box 69 Clay vol VIII No 85: Series B No. 41: Dorse 506]
see The National Archives

*******************************************

The above is a legal fiction to transfer the land. see 'Abstracts of Feet of Fines' - IG

quitclaim:
(Law) a formal renunciation of any claim against a person or of a right to land

Ian Goddards notes:
Crykelston must, I think, be Crigglestone. Cheyfft must be Chevet just E of Crigglestone, Walton is just E of Wakefield & Sandal is just W, in fact it was the administrative centre of the manor of Wakefield and Crigglestone was in the parish of Sandal Magna. There are two or three Staintons to choose from in Yorkshire but Doddeworth, Whiteley and Barnsley are all local. Dronfield is in Derbyshire, S of Sheffield.

So, to throw another cat amongst the pigeons, where was Henry's 'Dernylegh' bearing in mind that we're very close to the river Dearne here? Can it really be the Rochdale Dearnley?


Marriage:
Henry Dernelegh married Alice de Wyandene, daughter of Roger de Wyandene, about 1402
This is shown in 'The History of the Parish of Rochdale' p.391.



Note:
on 14 August 1440
Henry & Alice are mentioned in the following Duchy of Lancaster records.

57. Bukley, James de. Commission "ad inquirendum" to John de Radclyf of Ordeshale, knt., Richard de Radclyf of Radclyf, and Richard de Barton of Midelton, on the petition of the said James, showing that one Robert son of John de Bukley, being seised in his demesne, as of fee, of one messuage, one toft, one garden, and two acres of land in the township of Honnersfeld, married Alice Bukley, and, "infra sponsalia inter eos," the said Robert and Alice had issue John Bukley ; that aflerwards the said Robert,in the time of Ric. 2, gave all the said estate to Robert del Shore, chaplain, in fee simple, who gave the
same to the said Robertson of John for life, with remainder to John son of the same Robert son of John and his heirs begotten of Alice daughter of Roger de Wyandene; that after the death of the said Robert son of John, and John son of Robert son of John, the said estate remained to the said James as son and heir of the aforesaid John son of Robert and Alice his wife ; that after the death of the said Robert son of John, one Robert del Holt intruded on the said estate, and endowed the said Alice late wife of the said Robert of the said estate as dower of all the lands of the said Robert, son of John that the said Alice married Henry Derneleigh ; that James del Holt escheator of Hen. 4, co. Lanc., seised the said estate into the King's hands on the pretence that the said Henry was outlawed for felony; 'that it was found by iuq., 12 Hen. 6, that Alice, who was the wife of Robert de Bukley, was seised in dower of a. third of two messuages, forty acres of land, sixteen acres of meadow, a hundred acres of pasture, and ten acres of wood in Honnersfield, held in socage of Thomas Sayvill, chr; that the said Alice afterwards married Henry Derneleigh, who was outlawed for felony; that the said messuage, garden, toft, and two acres were parcel of the said messuage specified in the inq., and that James de Bukley was then heir of the said Robert de Bukley, son of John son of Robert in the said inq. named; and that John Radcliif accounted for the issues of the said messuage as of a third of the lands which were of Henry de Dernelegh in right of Alice his wife. 14 August.
(assumed to be 1440 - Henry VI was King of England from 1422 to 1461 and again from 1470 to 1471)

p. 536 APPENDIX TO THE FORTIETH REPORT OF THE
     No. 4.- Duchy of Lancaster Records
Decimus Octavus Annus Henrici Sexti (18th year of Henry V1)
see The Google Books.

Robert (?) de Buckley

ID# 14588, b. about 1345

Note:

In the time of Edward III. (1327-77), we find a John de Buckley living.
In 18 Henry T. (1439-40), we have evidence of a most satisfactory character, produced at a commission of enquiry before John de Radcliffe and others, that this John had a son, Robert de Buckley, who was seised in fee of a messuage and lands in Honnersfield, in the parish of Rochdale, and that he had married Alice, the daughter of Roger de Wyandene, and had issue a son, John, whose son, James, ultimately succeeded to the estate. He was living in 1439, and the James Buckley, who in 1492 gave to his son John a messuage, &c., called Stonie Hay (now Stoney Heys), in Healey, in the parish of Rochdale, was probably his son and heir. A descendant (possibly grandson) of this John, of Stoney Heys, was James Buckley, of Healey [see p. 26], who left a Will dated 20th October, 1595, in which he names his brothers, Francis and Anthony; and Francis, Thomas, James, Sara, and Grace, children of Francis ; and Richard and Ann, children of Anthony. Returning to the main line of descent, the next two generations as given by Dugdale are unquestionably wrong, and there is unfortunately no evidence to prove the correct descent, but the estate was afterwards found vested in Robert Buckley, who married
Grace, the daughter of John Holt of Ashworth, in the parish of Bury.


Birth:
Robert (?) de Buckley was born about 1345.


Robert (?) de Buckley was the son of John (?) de Buckley.

Marriage:
Robert (?) de Buckley married Alice de Wyandene, daughter of Roger de Wyandene, about 1366.

Child of Robert (?) de Buckley and Alice de Wyandene

John (?) de Buckley

ID# 14589, b. about 1370, d. October 1429
Birth:
John (?) de Buckley was born about 1370.


John (?) de Buckley was the son of Robert (?) de Buckley and Alice de Wyandene.

Marriage:
John (?) de Buckley married (?) (?) about 1391.


Death:
John (?) de Buckley died in October 1429.

Child of John (?) de Buckley and (?) (?)

(?) (?)

ID# 14590, b. about 1370
From about 1391, her married name was Buckley.
Birth:
(?) (?) was born about 1370.


Marriage:
(?) (?) married John (?) de Buckley, son of Robert (?) de Buckley and Alice de Wyandene, about 1391.

Child of (?) (?) and John (?) de Buckley