Mary Dearnley

ID# 12022, b. May 1821, d. March 1893
Mary Dearnley was also recorded as Dearnaley - (spelling not found but added for indexing.)
From 14 December 1851, her married name was Broadbent.
Birth:
Mary Dearnley was born in May 1821 at Honley Wood Bottom, Yorkshire, England.


Mary Dearnley was the daughter of Hannah Dearnley.

Baptism:
Mary Dearnley was baptised on 24 June 1821 at Chapelry of Honley, Honley, Yorkshire, England,
'Mary dau of Hannah Dearnley; abode: Honley Wood Bottom; Spinster.'


Marriage:
Mary Dearnley married Charles Broadbent, son of Joseph Broadbent, on 14 December 1851 at Parish Church, Almondbury, Huddersfield R.D., Yorkshire, England,
Charles Broadbent 34 Bachelor, Slubber res: Meltham fa: Joseph Broadbent, Farmer
Mary Dearnley 31 Spinster, res: Honley fa: ---, ---
Both made their mark
Witnesses: William Garner & James Garner.


Death:
Mary Dearnley died in March 1893 at Huddersfield R.D., Yorkshire, England, at age 71 years and 10 months
Indexed as Mary Broadbent aged 73.


Burial:
Mary Dearnley was buried on 18 March 1893 at St James, Meltham Mills, Yorkshire, England.

Mary Dearnley appeared in the 1841 census at
Wood Bottom, Honley, Almondbury, Yorkshire, England.
On 6 June 1841:-
note: Ages over 15 were rounded down to the nearest 5.
DEARNLEY, John 75 Farmer Yorkshire
DEARNLEY, Hannah 50 Cotton Warper Yorkshire
DEARNLEY, Mary 20 Yorkshire

RG number: HO107 Piece: 1274 Book/Folio: 3/50 Page: 18
Registration District: Huddersfield Sub District: Honley
Civil Parish: Almondbury
Address: Wood Bottom, Almondbury, Honley County: Yorkshire.



Mary Dearnley appeared in the 1851 census at
Woodbottom, Honley, Yorkshire, England.
On 30 March 1851:-

DEARNLEY, Hannah Head Unm 61 Farmer of 8 acres employing no lab. Meltham, Yorkshire
DEARNLEY, Mary Dau Unm 29 - Honley, Yorkshire

Address: Woodbottom, Honley, Yorkshire
Ecclesiastical District: South Crosland Registration District: Huddersfield, Honley
RG number: HO107 Piece: 2292 Folio: 153 Page: 32.



Mary Dearnley appeared in the 1861 census at
Wood Bottom, Honley, Yorkshire, England.
On 7 April 1861:-

DEARNLEY, Hannah Head Wid 71 - Honley, Yorkshire see Hannah Dearnley
BROADBENT, Charles Son-in-law Mar 44 Farmer & Woolling Hubler Meltham, Yorkshire
BROADBENT, Mary Dau Mar 39 House Work Honley, Yorkshire
BROADBENT, Levi Grandson Unm 8 Scholar Honley, Yorkshire see Levi Broadbent
BROADBENT, Hannah Granddau Unm 6 Scholar Honley, Yorkshire
BROADBENT, Ann Granddau Unm 2 - Honley, Yorkshire

Address: Wood Bottom, Honley, Yorkshire (West Riding)
Ecclesiastical district: South Crosland Registration district: Huddersfield
Enumeration district: 9 Archive reference: RG09
Piece number: 3248 Folio number: 54 Page number: 17.



Mary Dearnley appeared in the 1871 census at
Wood Bottom, Honley, Yorkshire, England.
On 2 April 1871:-

DEARNLEY, Hannah Head Wid 82 Farmer of 8 acres Honley, Yorkshire
BROADBENT, Mary Dau Mar 54 - Honley, Yorkshire
BROADBENT, Levi Grandson Unm 18 Tottler at ... Mill Honley, Yorkshire
BROADBENT, Hannah Granddau Unm 16 Side Tenter at Cotton Mill Honley, Yorkshire
BROADBENT, Ann Granddau - 12 Side Tenter at Cotton Mill Honley, Yorkshire
BROADBENT, Emma Granddau - 9 Scholar Honley, Yorkshire
BROADBENT, John Grandson - 6 Scholar Honley, Yorkshire

RG number: RG10 Piece: 4346 Folio: 48 Page: 14
Registration District: Huddersfield Sub District: Honley
Enumeration District: 9 Civil Parish: Honley
Address: Wood Bottom, Honley, Yorkshire.



Mary Dearnley appeared in the 1881 census at
Wood Bottom, Honley, Almondbury, Yorkshire, England.
On 3 April 1881:-

DEARNLEY, Hannah Head Unm 92 Farmer Of 9 Acres Honley, Yorkshire
BROADBENT, Mary Dau Mar 61 - Honley, Yorkshire
BROADBENT, Levi Grandson Unm 28 Grease Maker Honley, Yorkshire
BROADBENT, Hannah Granddau Unm 26 Feeder Woollen Mill Honley, Yorkshire
BROADBENT, Emma Granddau Unm 19 Side Tenter Cotton Mill Honley, Yorkshire
BROADBENT, John Grandson Unm 16 Bobbin Cotton Setter Honley, Yorkshire

Address: Wood Bottom, Honley, Yorkshire
Family History Library Film: 1342043 Public Records Office Reference: RG11
Piece/Folio: 4369/119 Page Number: 15.



Mary Dearnley appeared in the 1891 census at
Wood Bottom, Honley, Yorkshire, England.
On 5 April 1891:-

BROADBENT, Mary Head Mar 71 Retired Farmer Honley, Yorkshire, England
BROADBENT, Levi Son Sngl 38 Game Keeper Honley, Yorkshire, England

Address: Wood Bottom, Honley, Yorkshire (West Riding)
Registration district: Huddersfield Archive reference: RG12
Piece number: 3556 Folio: 127 Page: 11.


Children of Mary Dearnley and Charles Broadbent

Anne Dernley

ID# 12026, b. about 10 January 1636
Anne Dernley was also recorded as Dearnaley - (spelling not found but added for indexing.)
Birth:
Anne Dernley was born in 1636 at Derbyshire, England.


Baptism:
Anne Dernley was baptised about 10 January 1636 at Eyam, Derbyshire, England.


Anne Dernley was the daughter of Nicholas Dernley and Mary Wood.

Nicholas Dernley

ID# 12027, b. about 1612, d. before 1664
Nicholas Dernley was also recorded as Dearnaley - (spelling not found but added for indexing.)
He was also recorded as Nicholas Dernely.

Note:

A Nicholas Derneley of Eyam, Taylor died in 1638.
Possibly this Nicholas (or his father?).

Inventory - Nicholas Derneley 13 Oct 1638

1 A true inventory of the goods and chattells of Nicholas
2 Derneley of Eyam taylor late deceased taken the thirtenth
3 day of October in the foureteenth yeare of the raigne
4 of our Sov[er]aigne Lord Charles by the grace of god of England
5 Scotland France and Ireland Kinge defender of the
6 faith etc by John Sheldon George Wilson and Francis
7 Siddall vizt-----------------------------------------------------------------l----s----d
8 Imprimis his purse and his apparell-------------------------------0---10--0
9 Item one seeled cupboord-------------------------------------------0---13---0
10 Item fyve puter dublers one puter candlesticke}------------0---18---0
11 and one salt one brasse pott thre kettles and one}
12 skillet}
13 Item two chaffe beeds two bedhillings two cov[er]letts}-1--14---0
14 two payre of blanketts foure payre of sheetes}
15 two pillow beares one boordcloth}
16 two boulsters and two pillowes}
17 Item two payre of bedstockes two boordes foure}---------0--10---0
18 cheares three stooles and one forme}
19 item eight cusshins---------------------------------------------------0---2---8
20 Item thre loomes thre barrells two bouckes two}----------0--10--0
21 fatts w[i]th piggens, noggens, canns, and other}
22 wooden implements}
23 Item thirteene inch bowls------------------------------------------0---6---6
24 Item one swine--------------------------------------------------------0--12---0
25 Item two henns and one cocke-----------------------------------0----1---6
26 Item two chistes and one drawe box---------------------------0----3---4
27 Item a prassing iron a payre of shears a fire shovel}-------0---8----0
28 a frieing pan a payre of tongs a bandiron rackens}
29 with other iron ware}
30 Item one backston----------------------------------------------------0--0----6
31 ---------------------------------------------sum[ma] totalis-----------6--9---6
32 debts oweing by the sayd Nicholas Dernyley at his death
33 Imprimis to Peeter Ash----------------------------------------------7---0---0
34 item to Francis Andrew for rent-----------------------------------1---0---0
35 John Sheldon his marke Francis Siddall his marke
36 George Wilson his marke

Words from Wills by Stuart A. Raymond
line 9 a sealed cupboard is one panelled with a wooden frame.
line 10 a dubler is a large bowl or dish.
line 13 a bedhilling is a bedcovering.
line 20 a boucke is a bucket.
line 28 a racken is a chain or rack for supporting pots over the fire.

transcribed by Marie Ball
3 Dec 2011.



Note:

Nicholas Derneley of Eyam may be another child of Willimus Dernilon (1578-).
see Willimus Dernilon
Eyam is about 6 miles from Bradwall (now Bradwell) and Willimus's son William named his first son Nicholas. -JAD.


Birth:
Nicholas Dernley was born about 1612.


Marriage:
Nicholas Dernley married Mary Wood on 22 September 1633 at Eyam, Derbyshire, England.


Death:
Nicholas Dernley died before 1664.



Note:
between August 1665 and November 1666
Eyam is the village is best known for being the "plague village" that chose to isolate itself when the plague was discovered there in August 1665, rather than let the infection spread.

The plague had been brought to the village in a flea-infested bundle of cloth that was delivered to tailor George Viccars from London.
Within a week he was dead and was buried on 7 September 1665. After the initial deaths, the townspeople turned to their rector, the Reverend William Mompesson, and the Puritan Minister Thomas Stanley. They introduced a number of precautions to slow the spread of the illness from May 1666. These included the arrangement that families were to bury their own dead and the relocation of church services from the parish church of St. Lawrence to Cucklett Delph to allow villagers to separate themselves, reducing the risk of infection. Perhaps the best-known decision was to quarantine the entire village to prevent further spread of the disease. The plague raged in the village for 14 months and it is stated that it killed at least 260 villagers with only 83 villagers surviving out of a population of 350. This figure has been challenged on a number of occasions with alternative figures of 430 survivors from a population of around 800 being given. The church in Eyam has a record of 273 individuals who were victims of the plague.
When the first outsiders visited Eyam a year later, they found that fewer than a quarter of the village had survived the plague. Survival appeared random, as many plague survivors had close contact with the bacterium but never caught the disease. For example, Elizabeth Hancock never became ill despite burying six children and her husband in eight days (the graves are known as the Riley graves). The unofficial village gravedigger Marshall Howe also survived, despite handling many infected bodies, as he had earlier survived catching the disease.
source: Wikipedia.

Child of Nicholas Dernley and Mary Wood

Mary Wood

ID# 12028, b. about 1612, d. April 1667
From 22 September 1633, her married name was Dernely.
From 22 September 1633, her married name was Dernley.
Birth:
Mary Wood was born about 1612.


Marriage:
Mary Wood married Nicholas Dernley on 22 September 1633 at Eyam, Derbyshire, England.



Note:
in 1664
Widow Dernley (Mary) was not a householder in 1664.



Note:
between August 1665 and November 1666
Eyam is the village is best known for being the "plague village" that chose to isolate itself when the plague was discovered there in August 1665, rather than let the infection spread.

The plague had been brought to the village in a flea-infested bundle of cloth that was delivered to tailor George Viccars from London.
Within a week he was dead and was buried on 7 September 1665. After the initial deaths, the townspeople turned to their rector, the Reverend William Mompesson, and the Puritan Minister Thomas Stanley. They introduced a number of precautions to slow the spread of the illness from May 1666. These included the arrangement that families were to bury their own dead and the relocation of church services from the parish church of St. Lawrence to Cucklett Delph to allow villagers to separate themselves, reducing the risk of infection. Perhaps the best-known decision was to quarantine the entire village to prevent further spread of the disease. The plague raged in the village for 14 months and it is stated that it killed at least 260 villagers with only 83 villagers surviving out of a population of 350. This figure has been challenged on a number of occasions with alternative figures of 430 survivors from a population of around 800 being given. The church in Eyam has a record of 273 individuals who were victims of the plague.
When the first outsiders visited Eyam a year later, they found that fewer than a quarter of the village had survived the plague. Survival appeared random, as many plague survivors had close contact with the bacterium but never caught the disease. For example, Elizabeth Hancock never became ill despite burying six children and her husband in eight days (the graves are known as the Riley graves). The unofficial village gravedigger Marshall Howe also survived, despite handling many infected bodies, as he had earlier survived catching the disease.
source: Wikipedia.


Death:
Mary Wood died in April 1667 at Derbyshire, England.


Burial:
Mary Wood was buried on 1 May 1667 at Eyam, Derbyshire, England,
'Mary Dernley, widow'
from The Population of Eyam 1664-1667.


Child of Mary Wood and Nicholas Dernley

Ann Dernley

ID# 12029, b. October 1649
Ann Dernley was also recorded as Ann Dernely.
She was also recorded as Dearnaley - (spelling not found but added for indexing.)
Birth:
Ann Dernley was born in October 1649 at Padfield, Derbyshire, England,
shown as 'de Padfeild' in Glossop baptisms.


Ann Dernley was the daughter of William Dernely and Elizabeth Haigh.

Baptism:
Ann Dernley was baptised on 4 November 1649 at Glossop, Derbyshire, England,
Only Ann's father was named at her baptism.
Ann daughter of Will Dernely. (FamilySearch.)