Samuel Dearneley

ID# 3031, b. April 1643, d. about September 1700
Samuel Dearneley was also recorded as Samuel Derniley.
He was also recorded as Samuel Dernely.
He was also recorded as Dearnaley - (spelling not found but added for indexing.)
Birth:
Samuel Dearneley was born in April 1643 at Padfield, Derbyshire.


Samuel Dearneley was the son of William Dearneley (IV) and Marie Redditch.

Baptism:
Samuel Dearneley was baptised on 31 May 1643 at Glossop, Derbyshire.


Marriage:
Samuel Dearneley married Sarah (?) about 1665.



Will:
Samuel Dearneley left a will on 19 August 1700 at Crosscliffe, Glossop parish, Derbyshire.
Will of Samuel Derneley 1700

Abbreviations have been expanded thus: yeom(an), per(son)all. Guesses are in italics.

In the name of God Amen the nineteenth day of August in the Twelth
year of the Reigne of our sov(er)aigne Lord William the Third by the grace of God of England
Scot(lan)d Ffrance (and) Ireland King Defender of the ffaith Ano Dom 1700 I Samuel Derne
-ly of the Crosscliffe within the p(ar)ish of Glossopp in the County of Derby yeom(an) Being weak
and Indisposed in Body But of sound (and) disposeing memory praised be God for the same
doe make (and) declare this my last Will (and) Testam(en)t in writeing in manor (and) forme follow
ing That is to say first (and) principally I comitt my soul into the hands of Almighty
God my Creator hopeing through the meritts of Jesus Christ my Alone saviour
and Redeemer to obtaine free pardon (and) Remision of all my sines (and) to be made p(ar)taker
of Life Everlasting And my Body to the Earth from where it was taken to be
decently Interred at the discretion of my Exec(utor)s herein after named And as conc(ern)
ing such Worldly Estate as the Lord in mercy hath bestowed upon me I dispose
thereof in manor following That is to say my will (and) mind is that my due Debts
and funerall Expenses shall be discharged out of my p(er)sonall Estate Item I Give (and)
devise unto Sarah my now loveing wife one Annuity or yearly Rent Charge of seven
pounds p(er) anum of Lawfull money of England to be Issuable (and) payable forth of all
that my freehould Messuage ffarme (and) Tenem(en)t in Romeley in the County of Chester now in the pos-
session of one John Fordson his Assignes or Underten(an)t or Ten(an)ts At the yearly ffeasts
of St Michael the ArchAngell (and) Anunciaton of Blessed Lady Mary the
virgin by even (and) equall portons And to have continuance dureing her naturall life
In case she continue chast (and) in the state of Widowhood But in case my s(ai)d Wife shall
happen to Marry or Miscarry by Incontinency Then (and) from thenceforth It is my
Will (and) mind That the yearly sume of Three pounds shall be substracted by my Exec(utor)s
out of the aforesaid Anuity And that only the sume of ffour pounds p(er) Anum shall
be p(ai)d to her or her Assignes dureing the then Remainder of her naturall Life after such
Marriage or Miscarriage And it is now therefor my will (and) mind that the afores(ai)d lega
cy and devise to my said Wife soe Givein (and) directed as abovemenconed shall be Accepted by
her in full Recompence (and) satisfacton of her Dower or Title of Dower of in to or out
of my whole Estate otherwise the same to cease (and) become of noe force or Effect in
Lawe Item I Give (and) Bequeath unto my said wife All such Goods (and) Chattells as were
the pper(sonal) Goods (and) Chattells of the s(ai)d Sarah before her Intermarriage w(i)th me And have
since come and are in the Custody or possession of me by virtue of such my s(ai)d marriage
And I doe further Give (and) Bequeath unto my s(aid) Wife one Bedstead or pair of Bedcloths
to be chosen herselfe out of all my Beds Two Bedds standing now in sev(er)all p(ar)lours
In my dwelling house at Crosscliffe afores(ai)d onely excepted Item I give (and) Devise
unto my Executors and to the survivor of them All the residue (and) Remainder of my Goods
Creditts Cattells (and) Chattells as well reall as p(er)sonall not herein before devised to my s(ai)d
Wife as aforesaid In trust nev(er)thelesse (and) to the intent (and) purpose That my executors or
the survivour of them shall (and) will Improve the same to the best Advantage for the
Benefitt of my Two Daught(er)s Mary (and) Martha to be equally devided Between
them when they shall Respectively Attaine the Age of one (and) Twenty years or be espousered
in Marriage But in case either of my s(ai)d Daught(er)s shall happen to Marry without
the consent (and) Approbacon of my Exec(utor)s or one of them Then I doe Impower my s(ai)d Ex(ecut)ors
or the survivor of them to give (and) dispose to my other Daught(er) not soe marrying a larr
ger or greater share (and) pporton of my s(ai)d Goods Creditts (and) Chatells Than a Moity at their
or his discretion
Item I Give (and) Devise All my Messuages Houses Buildings Lands Tenem(en)ts and
Heriditam(en)ts whatsoever w(i)th their (and) every of their Appurten(ances)s Both ffreehould and
Coppyhould or Customary Lands or of the nature of either Lying (and) Being in the
sev(er)all Countyes of Yorke Lancaster Chester and Derby or in any of them wherein
I have any estate of Inheritance or ffreehould in possession Revision or Expectan
cy for Life Lives or otherwise dureing the continuance of such Estate To the sev(er)all uses
intents (and) purposes herein after mentoned expressed (and) declared That is to say To the
use (and) behoofe of my said Daught(er)s Mary Dernely (and) Martha Dernely and to the Heires
of their Bodyes Lawfully Issueing (and) to the survivour of them (and) her Heires And for
default of such Issue Then to the use (and) Behoofe of the Right Heires of me the
said Samuel Dernely for Ever Item my Will (and) mind is That my Exec(utor)s or the survi
vour of them shall have the Tuition (and) Guardianship of my s(ai)d Daught(er)s untill
they shall repectively become of Age (and) in a Capacity to dispose of them selves
by Lawe or shall Attaine the Age of one (and) Twenty yeares as afores(ai)d Item I doe
hereby Authorise (and) Impower my Exec(utor)s hereinafter named to surrender my Lease
(and) Terme of yeares of and in that ffarme (and) Tenem(en)t now in my possession at Crosscliffe
aforesaid to my Landlord Will(ia)m Stanfield or his Assignes in case he shall desire the
same And shall and doe in consideration thereof well (and) truly pay unto my Executors
the sume of Twenty pounds of Lawfull money of Eng(lan)d towards satisfaction fore such
Improvem(en)t as I have made upon the p(re)mises And shall (and) doe further secure the paym(en)t
of ffourty shillings p(er) Anum of Like Lawfull money to my Exec(utor)s for the use of my s(ai)d
Daught(er)s to have Continuance dureing the number (and) spaces of yeares in the Lease
I have thereof mentoned And Likewise doe (and) shall Allow the Rent for a certaine mea
dow called Hadfield Meadow dureing such s(ai)d Terme Item I Give (and) Bequeath
unto my Brother John Dernely (and) unto Thomas Hadfield of Hadfield in the p(ar)ish of
Glossopp (and) County of Derby yeom(en) to either of them ffive shillings of Lawfull money of
Eng(lan)d And I doe hereby Appoint them the s(ai)d John Derneley and Thomas Hadfield
Exec(utor)s of this my Last Will (and) Testam(en)t hopeing they will faithfully p(er)forme the same And
I doe request my kinsman Samuel Reddish to be overseer thereof And to Assist my
s(ai)d Exec(utor)s in the due Execution thereof And lastly I doe herby disanull (and) make void
all former Wills by me made (and) doe declare this for and as my Last Will (and) Testam(en)t
In Witnesse whereof I have hereunto putt my hand (and) seal the day (and) year ffirst
w(i)thin written Samuell Dearnely
Sealed published (and) declared by the Testotor
as his last Will (and) Testament in p(re)sence of
Booth Waterhouse
George Charlesworth
John Doxon


The next section is in Latin and indicates that probate was granted to John Dernely and Thomas Hadfield, Chesterfield, 2 October 1700. This is followed by the inventory.)

A true Inventory of the Goods Creditts Cattells (and) Chattells
of Samuel Dernely late of Crosscliffe in the p(ar)ish of
Glossopp in the County of Derby yeom(an) Dec(lare)d
Prized by us whose names are subscribed the
ffourteenth day of septemb(er) Ano Dom 1700
Impr(imi)s ti   s   d  
  In money in his purse (and) his Apparrell 06  00  00
It(em) Two Tables w(i)th fforms (and) 4 Chaires in Dwellinghouse 01  04  00
It(em) One Old Cupboard, Buffett, salt coffer (and) one Dress(er) 00  06  08
It(em) One ffire Iron Tongs fireshovell spIt(em)t (and) Racke 00  15  00
It(em) Two Tosting Irons, fore Iron sprIt(em)tle, Cleev(in)g Tongs 00  04  00
It(em) One Ould Grate 00  06  08
It(em) One Clock 02  00  00
It(em) ffour shelfe Boards 00  02  00
It(em) One Bedstead one Chest (and) one Chaire Table 01  06  08
It(em) One Bed w(i)th furnIt(em)ure, Chest and 11 Boards in p(ar)lour 03  00  00
It(em) One Meal Arke 2 Bedsteds (and) Bedding (and) Desk 03  00  00
It(em) One salting ffatt 00  06  00
It(em) seaven Corne sacks 00  12  00
It(em) six shelve Boards in the Buttery 00  01  06
It(em) six pewt(er) Dishes Three Porring(er)s (and) 2 Cups one  
  Candlestick (and) one Candle Cup (and) one Tankard 00  15  00
It(em) One Brasse pan one kettle 2 potts one  
  Candlestick (and) one pounding Morter 01  16  00
It(em) One Lead 00  05  00
It(em) In Meal (and) Wheat Beefe (and) Bacon 01  15  00
It(em) In butter (and) Cheese 00  10  00
It(em) In Linen yarns 01  00  00
It(em) ffour Quishons, Two Tables (and) Cupboard 03  00  08
It(em) One Bedstead 2 Arkes (and) one paire of Loomes 02  04  00
It(em) In Horse Gayres (and) saddles 00  06  08
It(em) One peece of timber (and) 2 Boards 00  12  00
It(em) Twenty six sheep (and) Ten sheep at ptes 07  09  00
It(em) Three Cowes 03  00  00
It(em) Two LIt(em)tle Bullocks 04  10  00
It(em) Two Twintes 02  13  04
It(em) Three LIt(em)tle Calves 02  05  00
It(em) In Corne (and) Hay 15  00  00
It(em) Two Cartt (and) one plow 02  00  00
It(em) Two Harrows 2 shov(el)s, forke, Mattock (and) Gowstock 00  09  08
It(em) One p(ar)cell of Latts Broken Wood for Husbandry  
  And Nine halfe Inch Boards 00  13  04
It(em) Debts oweing to the Testator upon specialty 311  10  06
It(em) In Booke Debts 33  09  03
It(em) One pair of Ballances 00  01  06
It(em) In all other hustemen in(and) ab(ou)t the House 00  07  06
  Sume               

John Waterhouse
Peter Bostocke
John Morton
Henry Hadfield


Transcribed by Janet A Davies
February 2012.


Death:
Samuel Dearneley died about September 1700 at Crosscliffe, Glossop parish, Derbyshire.

Children of Samuel Dearneley and Sarah (?)

Elizabeth Dernelee

ID# 3032, b. February 1635
Elizabeth Dernelee was also recorded as Dearnaley - (spelling not found but added for indexing.)
She was also recorded as Elizabeth Dernelee.

Note:

From John D's 1705 will, Elizabeth's (married) children could well be the four nieces named Sarah Dixon, Mary Langly, Anna Newton and Martha Charlesworth in John IV's will. However, without Elizabeth's married name it is hard to prove this, and they could be the nieces of one of John's two wives. - JAD
see John Dearnely.


Birth:
Elizabeth Dernelee was born in February 1635 at Padfield, Derbyshire.


Elizabeth Dernelee was the daughter of William Dearneley (IV) and Marie Redditch.

Baptism:
Elizabeth Dernelee was baptised on 8 March 1635 at Parish Church, Glossop, Derbyshire,
1634/5

FamilySearch shows Sudbury, although there are a number of errors in this database where Sudbury has been incorrectly substituted for Glossop.

Alice Dearnley

ID# 3033, b. about 1585
Alice Dearnley was also recorded as Dearnaley - (spelling not found but added for search.)

Note:

William & Elizabeth's children's birth order & dates are speculative from William's 1613 will.
- MED.


Birth:
Alice Dearnley was born about 1585.


Alice Dearnley was the daughter of William Dearnley (III) and Elsbeth Goddard.

Edward Dearnley

ID# 3034, b. about 1603, d. about 1661
Edward Dearnley was also recorded as Eduard Dernelee.
He was also recorded as Edward Dernelee.
He was also recorded as Dearnaley - (spelling not found but added for search.)

Note:

William & Elizabeth's children's birth order & dates are speculative from William's 1613 will.
- MED

Our principal guidance is the 1613 will:
1.     John and Nicholas are named as overseers of their father's will (in that order)
2.     Nicholas's inheritance is his father's farm, where his mother Elizabeth is to continue in residence
3.     I.G. suggests that John and William may have already received property, hence the minimal bequest of 3s 4d (obviously not an insult as John is      named as overseer of his father's will)
4.     Edward and the 2 girls share two-thirds of the rest of the estate (valued at over £30).

I am wondering if the above could be used to argue that Edward was the youngest of the sons.

(Also viz a viz Edward and Joane Brammall, their children (born and died Padfield) are only ten years adrift in age from Nicholas's, and they named their eldest daughter Elizabeth and their eldest son William.) - JAD.



Note:

There is the possibility of some confusion between this Edward of Padfield (c.1605-) & Edward D. of Hadfield (c.1616-) married to Elizabeth Hadfield (family raised in Padfield).
See Edward Derneley.


Birth:
Edward Dearnley was born about 1603.


Edward Dearnley was the son of William Dearnley (III) and Elsbeth Goddard.

Marriage:
Edward Dearnley married Joane Brammall on 18 April 1626 at All Saints Church, Glossop, Derbyshire.


Death:
Edward Dearnley died about 1661 at Padfield, Derbyshire.



Note:
in 1661
Inventory of Edward Dearneley of Padfield (Glossop)

page 1
1   The 27 daye of Jennury 64      
2   A true and perfet inventory of all      
3   the goods cattell and chattell of      
4   Edward Dernelie of Padfeld late      
5   deceased preised and valued      
6   the daye and yeare above written      
7   by William Derneli & Nicholas Braml      
8   Thomas Doxon and William Derneli junior li s d
9   Imprimis his purse girdle & apparell ---------- 2 0  
10   Item three coverlids thre pere }      
11   of blankets thre pere of         }      
12   sheet with other bedinge       } ---------- 3 10 0
13   It[em] three pere of bedstockes and }      
14   other bords                                   } ---------- 0 11 0
15   Ite[m] chise and arkes ---------- 1 5 0
16   It[em] in wooden ware ---------- 0 16 0
17   It[em] in pewter and brasse ---------- 1 10 0
18   Ite[m] in cheres and stoules ---------- 0 2 0
19   Ite[m] in ieron ware ---------- 0 5 0
20   It[em] seventeen sheep ---------- 4 10 0
21   It[em] two kine ---------- 8 0 0
22   It[em] two calves ---------- 2 0 0
23   Item one tacke of ground ---------- 24 0 0
24   the sum totalis ---------- 48 9 0
25   Deptes which ye testator oweth ---------- 10 2  


transcribed by Marie Ball
January 2012

page 2
Latin text dated 2 October 1661 which appears to mention Edwardi Dearnelei (Glossop) & Joanna Dearnelei de Hadfield

The dates here are confusing – the Inventory is clearly dated ’64 and the second page is 1661.
The William Derneli & William Derneli junior could be:
1. Edward's nephew William born 1616, son of Nicholas D. see William Dernely
2. Edward's brother (born circa 1588 so he would be quite old) & son. see William Dearnley
#1 seems the more likely.

A Thomas Doxon also was a witness of William D's 1613 will (Edward's father) see William Dearnley (III).


Children of Edward Dearnley and Joane Brammall

Elianor Dearnley

ID# 3035, b. about 1587
Elianor Dearnley was also recorded as Eleanor - (spelling not found but added for indexing.)
She was also recorded as Dearnaley - (spelling not found but added for search.)
She was also recorded as Eliza.
She was also recorded as Emma.

Note:

Name from William's 1613 will
I can't be entirely sure about the Elianor; it could be Eliza or even Emma at a push, but the paper is creased and small parts have flaked off.




Note:

William & Elizabeth's children's birth order & dates are speculative from William's 1613 will.
- MED.


Birth:
Elianor Dearnley was born about 1587.


Elianor Dearnley was the daughter of William Dearnley (III) and Elsbeth Goddard.

William Dearnley (III)

ID# 3036, b. about 1560, d. November 1613
William Dearnley (III) was also recorded as William Darnylee.
He was also recorded as William Dearnlye.
He was also recorded as William Dernley.
He was also recorded as William Dernelie.
He was also recorded as Dearnaley - (spelling not found but added for search.)

Note:

Key to Padfield+ Dearnleys:

     The generation mumbers are based on individuals known in 2016.

 John (I)  c.1450-, property in Holme, married to Alice  see John Dernelegh (I)
 William (I)  son of above; c.1474-  see William Dernelegh (I)
 John (II) of Padfield  c.1495-, brother or son of William (I)  see John Dernylye (II)
 William (II) of Padfield  b. before 1518, son of John (II)  see William Dernelee (II)
 William (III) of Padfield  c.1560-, likely descendant of William (II)
 (son or grandson), married Elizabeth
 
 John (III) of Padfield  c.1582-, son of William (III), married to Ann then Alice  see John Derneley (III)
 William (IV) of Mottram
 & Padfield
 c.1604-, married to Marie Redditch  see William Dearneley (IV).



Note:

The children's birth order & dates are speculative from William's 1613 will.

Our principal guidance is the 1613 will:
1.     John and Nicholas are named as overseers of their father's will (in that order)
2.     Nicholas's inheritance is his father's farm, where his mother Elizabeth is to continue in residence
3.     I.G. suggests that John and William may have already received property, hence the minimal bequest of 3s 4d (obviously not an insult as John is named as overseer of his father's will)
4.     Edward and the 2 girls share two-thirds of the rest of the estate (valued at over £30).

I am wondering if the above could be used to argue that Edward was the youngest of the sons.

(Also viz a viz Edward and John Brammall, their children (born and died Padfield) are only ten years adrift in age from Nicholas's, and they named their eldest daughter Elizabeth and their eldest son William.) - JAD.




Note:

Upperthong
In 1504 a William Dernelegh paid 17s heriot (a fee to inherit his father's estate) on the death of his father John and mother Alice.
see William Dernelegh (I)

In 1537 a William Dernelee paid 16s 8d as fine to inherit one messuage and 29 acres of land and meadow in (Upper)Thong and 3 acres and one rood in Mark Bottoms and "one rood of land parcel of one acre" at Binns1 after the death of John Dernelee his father.
see William Dernelee (II)

In 1585 there are more transactions involving land in Upperthong. In January William Darnylee of Padfield, Derbyshire, yeoman, let a tenement or house and 16 acres and one rood to William Broadhead of Middleton at a rent of 20s a year for a term of 21 years. However, in April William Darnylee surrendered by William Broadhead half a messuage and all its lands, meadows and tenements estimated at 16 acres and one rood, occupied by Nicolas Hadfield which were then let to John, son of Nicholas Hadfield for a term of 21 years.

When James I succeeded to the throne, the manor of Wakefield was a royal manor and James disputed a number of tenancies in 1608-9. As a consequence many tenants of the manor had to pay to have their tenancies secures. One of these was John D who paid 9s 5d, well into the upper quartile.

There is no evidence that any of these Dearnley families actually lived on this land in Upperthong and clearly William didn't in 1585. There are no Dearnleys in the parish registers at this time."

The William D of Padfield sounds particularly interesting as he must have been contemporary of Roger of Glossop in the lawsuit against the Whiteheads.
see Roger Dearnley

The similarity in the amounts of heriot suggests that the 1504 & 1537 estates could be the same. It looks as if by 1585 it had been subdivided - there's half a messuage and the area is also about half the 1537 area.

Ian Goddard

1 "Binns" : There is more than one Binns & in this context Binns is actually Upperthong.
see this streetmap.co.uk map
Mark Bottoms on this map is the valley of the stream just to the north running from Wolfstones to New Rd. The stream is the boundary between Upper-and Nether-thong and hence of Wakefield manor (Mark in this context must mean boundary, cf the Welsh Marches). - IG.


Birth:
William Dearnley (III) was born about 1560 at Derbyshire
before 1571.


Marriage:
William Dearnley (III) married Elsbeth Goddard, daughter of John Goddard, about 1575.




Note:
in 1585
In 1585 William (William III) let two parcels of land which, taken together, correspond to the description of the land taken by William II almost 50 years previously.
On 15 Jan 1585 William Darnylee of Padfield, Derbyshire, yeoman, surrendered by Nicholas Fenay, the lord's tennant, a tenement or house and 16 acres and one rood to William Broadhead of Middleton at a rent of 20s a year for a term of 21 years.
On 28 Apr 1585 William Darnylee surrendered by William Broadhead, the lord's tenant, half a messuage and all its lands, meadows and tenements estimated at 16 acres and one rood in Thong, occupied by Nicolas Hadfield to John, son of Nicholas Hadfield for a term of 21 years.
On 06 Dec 1585 William Deernelee was godfather of Elizabeth, daughter of John Hadfelde of Upperthong baptised at Almondbury, the only mention of a Dearnley in the surviving Almondbury and Kirkburton registers prior to the 1650s. Agnes, John's wife, was buried the same day having died in childbirth.
In 1613 William Dearnlye of Padfeld made a Will naming his wife Elizabeth, Nicholas, John, Edward and William and daughters Alice and ?Elianor. He also names William Collier as a son-in-law to whom he owes money. He also mentions debts owing to him from Thomas Oldham and John Broadhead, both of Upperthong in the parish of Almondbury for rents and, part of the latter's fine. Nevertheless the Upperthong property itself does not appear to be mentioned in the will. Nicholas received the Padfield estate apart from Elizabeth's share during her widowhood. John & William receive nominal sums suggesting they had already received property. The presence of looms and wool amongst the farming stock and implements in William's inventory suggests that William followed the same lifestyle as the clothiers, as they came to be called, of the West Riding.
According to a Goddard pedigree dated 1591 Elizabeth, daughter of John, son of Sir John Godard, Kt, of Glossop, was the wife of William Dernly.
The William of the leases and of the Will seem likely to have been the same person and the William of the 1591 pedigree may also have been.
Although William III's origins are not certain he seems likely to have been a descendant of William II. If John II died young then William III is likely to have been William II's son but an intermediate generation can't be excluded. He married Elizabeth, probably Elizabeth Godard. - Ian Goddard.



Note:
in 1591
Living during the 1591 Heraldic Visitations of Wales. (towards the end of Elizabeth I reign)
source: FamilySearch

Heraldic visitation
Heraldic Visitations were tours of inspection undertaken by Kings of Arms in England, Wales and Ireland in order to regulate and register the coats of arms of nobility and gentry and boroughs, and to record pedigrees. They took place from 1530 to 1688, and their records provide important source material for genealogists.

Process of visitations
By the fifteenth century, the use and abuse of coats of arms was becoming widespread in England. One of the duties conferred on William Bruges, the first Garter Principal King of Arms was to survey and record the armorial bearings and pedigrees of those using coats of arms and correct irregularities. The officers of arms of England made occasional tours of various parts of the country to enquire about matters armorial during the fifteenth century.[2] It was not until the sixteenth century that the process began in earnest.

The first provincial visitations were carried out under warrant granted by Henry VIII to Thomas Benolt, Clarenceux King of Arms dated 6 April 1530.[3] He was commissioned to travel throughout his province and was given authority to enter all homes and churches. Upon entering these premises, he was authorized to "put down or otherwise deface at his discretion...those arms unlawfully used".[4] He was also required to enquire into all those using the titles of knight, esquire, or gentleman and decided if they were being lawfully used.

By this writ, Henry VIII also compelled the sheriffs and mayors of each county or city visited by the officers of arms to give aid and assistance in gathering the needed information. When a King of Arms, or his deputy, visited a county, his presence was proclaimed by presenting the Royal Commission and the local gentry and nobility were required to provide evidence of their right to bear arms. The Sheriff would collect from the bailiff of each hundred within his county a list of all people using titles or arms. These were summoned to the visitation and the hope was that none would escape the enquiry. The people that were summoned were to bring their arms, and proof of their right to use the arms. Their ancestry would also be recorded. Where an official grant of arms had been made, this was recorded. Other ancient arms, many of which predated the establishment of the College of Arms, were confirmed. The officer would record the information clearly and make detailed note that could be entered into the records of the College of Arms when the party returned to London. These volumes now make up the Library of Visitation Books at the College, which contain a wealth of information about all armigerous people from the period.[5] If the officers of arms were not presented with sufficient proof of the right to use a coat of arms, they were also empowered to deface monuments which bore these arms and to force persons bearing such arms to sign a disclaimer that they would cease using them.

The visitations were not popular with the landed gentry who were required to present proof of their gentility. Members of this class grew in power after the installation of William III in 1688, and further commissions to carry out visitations were not issued by William or his successors. This cessation of the visitations did not have much effect on those counties far removed from London. Over the period of visitations many of these counties were rarely visited. Those closer to London were more frequently subject to inspection. Also, there was never a systematic visitation of Wales. There were four visitations in the principality, and on 9 June 1551, Fulk ap Hywel, Lancaster Herald of Arms in Ordinary was given a commission to visit all of Wales. This was not carried out, however, as he was degraded and executed for counterfeiting the seal of Clarenceux King of Arms. This is regrettable, since no visitation of all Wales was ever made by the officers of arms.[6]
source: Wikipedia.



Note:
in 1599
In the 1599 will of Nicholas Hadfielde of Hadfield (Findmypast) his list of debtors starts thus:

     Debtes Owinge to me
first Willyam Dernelye of Padfield of lent money
w(hich) I lent hym xxxviijs
It(em) Ould Willym Dernely father of … aforesaid
Wm Dernelye of lent money, w(hich) I lent hym
at another tyme xs


The impression given is that this William (III) is now running the Padfield establishment and so is given the label of 'William Dernelye of Padfield', implying that his father had, at some point, made over the property to him. Maybe this Derbyshire handover was at the same time as the 1585 transactions on the Yorkshire property?

William (III) is currently listed as c.1560- but could be a little earlier. The gap from William (II) to William (III) could be explained by a late marriage, lots of daughters, and maybe an older son who died young.

All in all, my feeling is that 'Ould William' is William (II). -JAD.


Will:
William Dearnley (III) left a will on 25 October 1613 at Padfield, Derbyshire.
Will of William Dearnlye of Padfield, 1613

1 In the name of God amen the xxvth daye of October Anno Domini 1613
2 I William Dearnlye of Padfeld in the parishe of Glossoppe and Countie of
3 Darbie beinge sicke in bodie yeat in good and perfect memorie thankes be to god
4 thereon and dreedinge the uncertaine hower of naturall death doe order
5 constitute and make this my last will and testament in maner and
6 forme followinge viz first I give and bequeth my soule into the
7 handes of almightie god my only Saviour and Redeemer and my
8 bodie to be buried in the parishe church of Glossop and for the
9 disposinge of my goodes my will ys and I doe Assigne the whole
10 estate or my farme and tenement unto my sonne Nicholas after my
11 decease my (of crossed through) and (my sonne Nicho crossed through) Elizabeth my wife accordinge to
12 a covenant formerly made betwene me and my sonne Nicholas and Elizabeth
13 my wyfe to have the moitie or one halfe of my sayd farme or tenement
14 dureing her life naturall and keepping hear sole and unmarried and
15 yf it please god to calle for Elizabeth my wyfe ether within this lease
16 nowe latlye taken of my L. the Earle of Arrundall or any other lease
17 hearafter taken then it ys my will that my sonne Nicholas shall pay
18 so mache monye or goodes as shalbe to expende of any lease or leases
19 soe taken at the decease of my aforesayd wife to whome my sayd wyfe shall
20 appointe it to be payd unto Also my will ys that after my funerall expenses
21 legacies and debtes discharging I give and bequeth the third parte of the
22 Whole goodes to Elizabeth my wife and the rest of my goodes not bequeathed
23 I give unto my sonne Edward my daughter Alice and my daughter Elia[nor] To be equally devided amongst them. Also I give and bequeath unto my

I can't be entirely sure about the Elianor; it could be Eliza or even Emma at a push, but the paper is creased and small parts have flaked off. - MB

24 son John Dearnlye iiis iiiid [3s 4d] in full satisfaction of his childes parte
25 or portion and to my sonne William Dearnlye iijs iiijd in full satisfaction
26 of his childes parte or portion Also I give unto my sonne Nicholas ?some
27 coubbords and all the bedstockes in the house after the decease of Elizabeth
28 my wyfe and all other thinges contained in a covenant formerly
29 made betwine my sonne Nicholas and me Also I make Elizabeth
30 my wyfe my lawfull executor my overseers my twoe sonnes John
31 Dearnlye and Nicholas Dearnlye trusting the will see this my last
32 will performed to the comfort of my soule by my executor
33 witnesses Charles Hadfeld John Hadfeld & Tho Doxson
34 debtes oweing unto me William Dearnlye ??
35 John Dearnlye------ iij li-----vi s----viij d
36 Item Tho Oldame of the Upper Thonnge in the }
37 parishe of ?Olmburie (Almondbury) and countie of York } ---xx s
38 Item the same Tho Oldame for a halfe }
39 yeare rent due at St Andrew }
40 the apostle next cominge------xxxiij s iiij d
41 Item John Brodhead of the towne and }
42 countie aforesayd for rente } ----iij li
43 Item the sayd John Brodhead for }
44 parte of his fynne }------xl s
45 debtes which I doe owe
46 to my sonne in law William Collier-xv li----vj s----viij d


Inventory
1  A true and lawfull inventorie of all the goods and catteles and    
2  chatteles movable and unmovable prised the xiijth daye of november    
3  by Charles Hadfeld Tho Doxon John Hadfeld and    
4  Nicholas Hadfeld    
5  Firste his purse girdle and his apparell ----- prised ----- xx s         
6  In his purse -----   v s         
7  Item his beddinge ----- prised ---- iij li         x s         
8   Item one coubborde ----- prised ----- xxx s         
9  Item wodden lombes yornware and other -----    
10  Implementes belonging to houskeepinge ----- prised ---- x s          
11  Item arkes garners coffer bordes & bedstockes -----    
12  Item twoe stone troughes ----- prised iij s    iiij d
13  Item meale and malte ----- prised ----- xviij s          
14  Item freshe butter and cheese ----- prised ----- xv s          
15  Item wolling yarne ----- prised ----- xxix s    iiij d
16  Item three bullockes and one hefer ----- prised ----- xi li                      
17  Item twoe ?cine ----- prised ---- v li                      
18  Item one stirke ----- prised ------ xxvi s   viij d
19  Item one calfe ----- prised ---- -xiij s    iiij d
20  Item one mare ----- prised ----- xl s           
21  Item one ?halfeswine ----- prised ---- x s          
22  Item heaye & corne ----- prised ----- iiij li                       
23  Item husbandrie ?gaine ploughe harrowes    
24  and yokes and other implementes    
25  theirunto belonging ----- prised ----- xiij s   iiij d
26  Item p??? ----- prised ----- xxxvj li       viij s   iiij d


transcribed by Marie Ball.


Death:
William Dearnley (III) died in November 1613 at Padfield, Derbyshire.

Children of William Dearnley (III) and Elsbeth Goddard

William Dearnley

ID# 3037, b. about 1588
William Dearnley was also recorded as Dearnaley.

Note:

William & Elizabeth's children's birth order & dates are speculative from William's 1613 will.
- MED

Could this be the William D. who married Elizabeth Taylor in Emley in 1625?
see William Dearneley.


Birth:
William Dearnley was born about 1588.


William Dearnley was the son of William Dearnley (III) and Elsbeth Goddard.

Ann (?)

ID# 3038, b. about 1591
From about 1612, her married name was Dernellee.
From about 1612, her married name was Dernely.
Birth:
Ann (?) was born about 1591.


Marriage:
Ann (?) married Nicholas Dernely, son of William Dearnley (III) and Elsbeth Goddard, about 1612.

Children of Ann (?) and Nicholas Dernely

Alice Dernellee

ID# 3040, b. January 1620, d. May 1621
Alice Dernellee was also recorded as Dearnaley - (spelling not found but added for indexing.)
She was also recorded as Alicia Dernellee.
Birth:
Alice Dernellee was born in January 1620 at Padfield, Glossop, Derbyshire.


Alice Dernellee was the daughter of Nicholas Dernely and Ann (?)

Baptism:
Alice Dernellee was baptised on 7 January 1621 at All Saints Church, Glossop, Derbyshire,
shown as 1620/21 7 Jan.


Death:
Alice Dernellee died in May 1621 at Padfield, Glossop, Derbyshire, at age 1 year and 4 months.


Burial:
Alice Dernellee was buried on 4 May 1621 at All Saints Church, Glossop, Derbyshire.